Class Restriction And Registration Summary

 

ASIA 30341 - Section 01: Charlie Don't Surf (CRN 30543)


Course Description:
In Apocalypse Now (1979), a single phrase marks an iconic enemy and creates a chain of associations that separate Western Selves from Eastern Others. The story behind the phrase, "Charlie don't surf," is one of many complex narratives characterizing the Southeast Asian region that call for further critical understanding. This course is an anthropological journey through Southeast Asia, a region rich in cultural diversity, linguistic complexity and archaeological significance. Including the Philippines, Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaysia, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, and Myanmar (Burma), students can explore the ecological, historical, and socio-cultural patterns of this ethnographic region through analyses of its societies and institutions. With a holistic approach to the cultural influences that characterize Southeast Asia, we will chart the region's indigenous, social, political, economic, artistic and religious formations over time. The course offers a broad overview of the historical factors affecting the region, including the impact of Indian, Islamic, Chinese, and European exchange, colonization, and violence. These transregional influences provide a window from which to view contemporary issues in the cultural politics and economics of Southeast Asia. The course provides an overview of the major cultural features of the region to enable students to gain a better understanding of the current developments within the region and the lives of Southeast Asians. Overall, we will contribute to the development of anthropological ideas about Asia while also providing a means to organize and analyze Asian ethnographic perspectives.

Associated Term: Spring Semester 2016
Campus: Main
Credits: 3
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
Course may not be repeated




Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Employee Non-Degree (EM) ,  St. Mary's College (SM) ,  Undergraduate Non-Degree (UD) ,  Undergraduate (UG)
Must be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
Main (M)

Course Attributes:
ASHU -Asian Studies Humanities ,  ASSS - Asian Studies Soc Sci

Registration Availability (Overflow: Off )
  Maximum Actual Remaining
TOTAL 1 1 0



Crosslist Information
Class Information Maximum Actual Remaining
ANTH  33203 01, CRN 29889  (Primary) 18 11 7
ASIA  30341 01, CRN 30543   1 1 0
Total 19 12 7
Enhanced Class Search
Instructor's Description of Course » Haanstad, Eric » ASIA  30341 - Section 01:  Charlie Don't Surf (CRN 30543)
This section presents the instructor's preliminary design of the course. It is intended to help students gain a general sense of what the course will be like.
Course Objectives
Develop broad familiarity with Southeast Asia through the lens of cultural anthropology.
Become acquainted with the geography, cultural diversity, prehistory, history, and processes of colonialism in Southeast Asia.
Describe how anthropologists study cultural life and cultural change in Southeast Asia.
Explore anthropological methods and ethnography as a means of describing local cultural life in Southeast Asian nations, across their borders, and around the world.
Analyze globalization as a concept and assess its impact on local ways of life in the region.
Additional Instructor Comments
In Apocalypse Now (1979), a single phrase marks an iconic enemy and creates a chain of associations that separate Western Selves from Eastern Others. The story behind the phrase, ?Charlie don?t surf,? is one of many complex narratives characterizing the Southeast Asian region that call for further critical understanding. This course is an anthropological journey through Southeast Asia, a region rich in cultural diversity, linguistic complexity and archaeological significance. Including the Philippines, Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaysia, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, and Myanmar (Burma), students can explore the ecological, historical, and socio-cultural patterns of this ethnographic region through analyses of its societies and institutions. With a holistic approach to the cultural influences that characterize Southeast Asia, we will chart the region?s indigenous, social, political, economic, artistic and religious formations over time. The course offers a broad overview of the historical factors affecting the region, including the impact of Indian, Islamic, Chinese, and European exchange, colonization, and violence. These transregional influences provide a window from which to view contemporary issues in the cultural politics and economics of Southeast Asia. The course provides an overview of the major cultural features of the region to enable students to gain a better understanding of the current developments within the region and the lives of Southeast Asians. Overall, we will contribute to the development of anthropological ideas about Asia while also providing a means to organize and analyze Asian ethnographic perspectives.
Use of Class Time Extent (0-3 scale)
Class discussions or case study reviews
Cooperative learning (small groups)
Movies, audio tapes, web clips, etc.
Field trips, experiential learning, or site visits/immersions (during or in lieu of class time)
In-class exercises, simulations/games, or problem set work
Instructor demonstrations
Lecture: present material not in the readings
Lecture: review/elaboration of reading material
Museum or library visits
Quizzes or tests
Student presentations
Student recitals, demonstrations, role plays, or performances
Kinds of Assignments or Learning Activities Emphasis (0-3 scale)
Reading
In-class participation
Term/research papers (10 or more pages)
1-2 page essays, arguments, reflection papers, or question sets
Class attendance
Creative writing (less than 10 pages)
Group student performances or creations
Individual student presentations
Individual, original research projects or interviews
Quizzes
Student evaluations of each others' work
Types of Reading Materials Extent (0-3 scale)
Journal/research articles
Scholarly books, monographs, or other non-fiction texts
Case studies, court cases, or precedents
Essays, treatises, or commentaries
Histories or biographies
Lecture notes or supplements
Novels
Official primary sources (govt or church documents, annual reports, etc.)
Other instructor-written handouts
Other students' papers, essays, or reflections
Plays or screenplays
Poetry
Popular press (newspapers, magazines, etc.)
Reference materials
Short stories, folklore, or mythology
Role of teaching assistants (TAs)
Not at all

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